Tuesday, September 26, 2017

What demographic issues do you think deserve coverage?


I know I ask this periodically of our readership, but I remain curious. What population-issues do you think should be covered, here or elsewhere? Are there particular regions or particular themes you would like explored?

(I can promise a post on Puerto Rico for tomorrow. More to come after that, too.)

5 comments:

Anonymous said...

Everything about Africa !

Steve Salmony said...

Let's Talk About FOOD!

https://www.mediamonitors.net/perspectives/increasing-food-production-distribution-human-consumption-causes-population-growth/

Nick said...

How populations change based on identity accession/succession in addition to migration/differential fertility!

Steve Salmony said...

Would scientists with and without appropriate expertise please devote some attention to the 'Human Asteroid' that currently threatens future human well being and environmental health? If somehow not already visible, the 'asteroid' takes its shape in the form of 7.5 human beings now here on Earth. This asteroid is growing in size at the rate of 80+/- million newborns per year and increasing since the date of my birth by 5+/- billion despite declining total fertility rates (TFRs) in many countries.***

***With regard to the many countries with declining TFRs, please note how many of these countries are still well above a TFR at which absolute global human population numbers could be maintained and stabilized.

Steve Salmony said...

Just for a moment, let us choose to think globally. From a species-wide perspective human propagation data and evidence of reproduction numbers of individuals, even in many places and different regions, point in different directions. Choosing the scope of observation is like deciding to look at either the forest or the individual trees, at either the wave or its molecules. Please examine the global challenge before us as a species propagation problem that is not related to individual or local or regional counts of human reproduction numbers.

Imagine that we are looking at a huge ocean wave, watching it move toward us on the shore. Think of a tsunami. The wave is moving toward us; however, at the same time, there are many molecules in the wave that are moving in the opposite direction, against the tide. If we observe that the propagation of the global human population is like the wave, and the reproduction numbers of individuals or certain locales or different regions are like the molecules, it is inaccurate for the latter to be looked at as if it tells us something meaningful about the former because many of the individual or groups in many locations are the 'human molecules' that move naturally against the 'wave of humanity' which is propagating before our eyes.

Choosing a scope of observation is like deciding to look at either the forest or the individual trees, at either the wave or its molecules. Thus, the global challenge before us is a species propagation problem that is simply not related to individual or local or regional counts of human reproduction numbers. Regardless of these reproduction numbers and lowering TFRs in a multitude of locations, the human population is still growing as well as moving toward those of us on the shore who are observing the enlarging size and direction of the human population wave.