Tuesday, September 23, 2014

Still here!

It has been a while, I know, but Demography Matters is still here. I've got the raw material for new posts in the works. A question to you, our readers. What would you like to see? Are there any particular areas or regions of the world, perhaps, or any kind of themes? Leave your suggestions in the comments.

19 comments:

Brett said...

In lieu of the news about population growth projections now being to "11 billion and growing by 2100", I'd like to know more about the demography of Africa - assuming you can get any useful data on it.

jemand said...

I'd like to see revisiting old posts on aging populations, demographic transition, and low fertility trap with new data, to see if anything has changed on the trends yet.

Rafael H M Pereira said...

Population shrinkage, Labor force and population projections and spatial demography :)

Greg said...

What Brett, Jemand, and Rafael said!

I'd also like to see explanations of the rationales for fertility and mortality projections. UNPOP, for instance, seems to assume a "reversion to replacement level" in its fertility forecasts for countries currently below replacement, but I have found nothing to suggest that this is anything other than plucked out of the air.

Ape Man said...

Some math focused posts on what it would take turn around the demographics of Japan would be nice. Would save me the trouble of writing one.

I am getting tired of being told you can't predict the future and so it is silly to worry about Japan's demographics. I don't think a lot of people of say those things understand the mathematical implications of the present.

Abu Daoud said...

A key question I have is about the death of cultures. Some of the countries in Europe are in irreversible (we think) demographic decline. What will replace them? Will they be depopulated? Will migrants come in from elsewhere? I know of no one who has tackled this question.

Ba-ldei Aga said...

Ukraine

Anonymous said...

Question: what are various populations doing to confront their aging populations?

I understand that Japan is investing a lot in robots for labour.

I sometimes wonder whether our current social models will radically change. Why do we need all this education to get on the job market, when so many jobs don't need all that education? It seems to me that one possible solution to the labour shortage caused by aging populations is to let people onto the job market earlier.

Anonymous said...

(question should be what are various COUNTRIES doing to confront issue of aging populations.)

Anonymous said...

Russia, the bug unknown.

Anonymous said...

I would like to see a revisiting of your post from 10 years ago on Muslims in France. Thanks :)

Ben said...

I would like something about the demographic changes in the middle east - between the drop in fertility in the region (where will it stop ?) to the huge demographic changes created by the wars in Syria and Irak - ethnic cleansing of Sunnis, importation of hundred of thousands of Shiites from Irak, genocide of christians and yazidis and so on.

Anonymous said...

Would like straight talk about the recent claims of 8-9 billion population by 2100.

Also would like an update on coming U.S. population decline and perhaps policies states should start considering for the coming downsizing.

Thanks!

- Timothy

(BTW I check your blog every Monday for the rare update.)

don random said...

religious demography

Billabong said...

Israeli wishful thinking about the Arab/ Palestinian population growth - who still have a much higher birth rate and younger age profile as well as younger mothers. Its fear of the bedouins (by some accounts the largest birth rate in the world) and attempt to forcibly relocate them.

Jonathan said...

You are not really updated. In Israel proper Jewish and Arab birthrates are almost equal (including Bedouins) - 21/1000 for Jews, 23/1000 for Arabs and falling. We do not have serious data for the West Bank - the CIA factbook says the FTR is 2.8 for example while the official data is 3.7.
In Jerusalem in 2012, the Arab muslim FTR was 3.6 (almost the same as Israeli muslim FTR) while the Jewish one was 4.3. I don't know if the Jerusalem Arab population is representative of the Palestinian West Bank one - it is maybe more religious and more important they get Israeli social security which has been proved to encourage natality among Arabs. So I guess the overall FTR in the WB was lower.

Anonymous said...

@Billabong--Please check your facts. Between the River and the Sea Jewish fertility is 3.0 Arab Fertility is 3.3 and falling. The demographic balance will stabilize with a slight Arab majority. Take your politics somewhere else.

jim said...
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
Anonymous said...

Joel Kotkin says that the suburbs have a higher birth rate than the inner city. Does housing type affect fertility behaviour? Or is that because of people starting a family moving to the suburbs?